palimpsest1_edited.jpg
On Migration II

On Migration II

Senninbari Study, Waterleaf Studies

Senninbari Study, Waterleaf Studies

senninbaristudytext2

senninbaristudytext2

Senninbari Study

Senninbari Study

Photographer: Dan Meyers

Senninbari Study

Senninbari Study

Photographer: Dan Meyers

Senninbari Study

Senninbari Study

Photographer: Dan Meyers

Waterleaf Study

Waterleaf Study

Silk net embedded in fermented Thai Kozo paper

Waterleaf Study

Waterleaf Study

Silk free-motion embroidery embedded in fermented Thai Kozo paper

Waterleaf Study

Waterleaf Study

Rust-dyed tencel weaving in fermented Thai Kozo paper

Waterleaf Study

Waterleaf Study

Rust-dyed tencel weaving in fermented Thai Kozo paper

Waterleaf Study

Waterleaf Study

Silk weaving embedded in fermented Thai Kozo paper

Waterleaf Study

Waterleaf Study

Silk paper blowout

Waterleaf Study

Waterleaf Study

Silk paper blowout

Waterleaf Study

Waterleaf Study

Silk paper blowout

Space II: Senninbari Study, Waterleaf Studies

Displayed as part of the 2019 MICA Undergraduate Commencement Exhibition, Palimpsest is a solo show investigating the generational repercussions of forced relocation through iron oxidation and magnetization, the woven structure and use of water-soluble weft, and waterleaf paper structures. The exhibition was divided into three spaces, to display a suite of works considering each subject. Poetry and supplemental wall text were interspersed throughout the exhibition.

~

In the second space, supplementary text defines the terms "Watari-Dori" and "Magnetoreception," continuing on to posit an alternative understanding of a 'placeless' people as one who is "always flying home."

Senninbari Study utilizes the Japanese military tradition of the "Senninbari" to align the acts of embroidering and hammering as punctures that both strengthen and weaken a substrate. The handwoven vest, resting on a handmade stoneware hanger, holds 1000 nails that oxidize with the aid of a provided spray bottle.

Waterleaf Studies explore pulp structure through hand papermaking. Embedding handwoven or netted structures into fermented Thai Kozo paper. Silk paper involves pulp so fine that it allows for the creation of blowouts—stenciled areas where a layer of paper pulp can be misted away to reveal a translucent pattern or image.